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20130224
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people eligible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equal basis. i think that this debate is actually
, and i mean-- i do not mean this to be in any way disrespectful toward religion-- but is it like a political convention? do you have people getting together feeling each other out? because one of you is going to be elected to this job. what's it like inside one of those conclaves? >> well, before the conclave actually start, there are a number of days when all the cardinals come together so that we can actually talk among ourselves, begin to get a better sense of one another. there are going to be 117 of us there with the right to vote. and just to get to know a little bit better personally one another, there will be four or five days of these meetings. but it-- >> schieffer: will you in any way-- could you be the nominee? >> no, that-- that enters into the world of fantasy. but when we get back into the real world i think what will happen is a number of cardinals will begin to surface in the conversation among all of us as particularly appealing candidates. it's not like a political process, though. there aren't nominations, and you don't have people saying, "i vote for..." and
of that is that i am not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people elible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equa basis. i think that this debate
was also interested in spreading religion and stuff, primarily it was about spices. why were spice is so valuable that it? well, it wasn't just that food was terrible in europe at the time. and it was. but each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. it might make you feel a bit more brandy, passionate but this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day. all right? so that is one of the reasons why this became so valuable. so after the conquest and colonization, the fed made a fortune exporting drugs back to europe. i drugs i mean sugar and many people consider a drug, it's where we get rum from. definitely drug, coffee, tobacco, and of course aphrodisiacs spices. so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. think about where we are today, washington dc, virginia, maryland, these were all drugs back in that time. a lot of these drugs were introduced back to europe and people look at them with revulsion. tobacco, why would you put fire and smoke into your mouth. coffee was a death penalty offense in many states for many re
, ensures our freedom of speech and religion and all the rest? i don't think so. i think the american people ensure those rights. anyway. >>> neck, full fication with a twist. a montana gun lobbyist is proposing a new sheriff's first bill which would allow county sheriffs to pick and choose which federal laws they wanted to enforce in their state. if a federal agent arrests someone without stopping in at the sheriff's office first, that agent would be arrested and charged with kidnapping the person they arrested. as gary mar bid told mother jones, the alcohol and tobacco federation might say that we have probable cause to believe that we have this person in the our county who is making firearms who ut a license and the sheriff might say, well, gosh, under the montana firearms freedom act, that's protected activity in montana, so you don't have my permission for this bust. well, this nullification type proposal was cleared by a vote by the state's republican-led house judiciary committee just this week. >>> finally, who do you think really has got the short end of the stick when it comes to t
talking about? nobody. end is the second amendment right to bear arms, our freedom of speech and religion and the rest? i don't think so. i think the people do. and a twist on a montana gun lobbyist proposing a new sheriff's first bill which would allow county sheriffs to pick and choose which federal laws they want it enforto enforce. if someone stops at the sheriff's office first, that agent would be stopped and arrested for the person they arrested. the alcohol and federation which is the atf, says someone is making firearms without a license. and gosh, under the montana firearms freedom act that is protected. you don't have any permission for this bust. this nullification type proposal was cleared bay vet by the state's republican led house judiciary committee just this week. >>> finally, who do you think really has the short end of the stick when it comes to the looming spending cuts that are set to hit march 1st? pentagon controller -- comptroller, robert hail is taking it in stride. he told the washington post, when i walk down the hall, people still wave, but with fewer fingers. i
in the rye." and, of course, there was poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliot's four quartets. and we learned attitude from yates and from the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud, open-eyed and laughing to the tomb. and i loved this epitaph of an ancient greek sailor. it's in a greek anthology translation by dudley fitz, wonderful teacher. tomorrow the wind will have fallen, tomorrow i will be safe in harbor, tomorrow, i said, and death spoke in that little word. o stranger, this is the nemesis of the spoken word, bite back the daring tongue that would say tomorrow. we marveled at keats' ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard ball rolling across a smooth table. we hungered for lives that had the emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets. and if we were going to be saved, we knew it would be by literature. and it was the french historian jules membership lay who put it best for me as i tried in my mid 40s to turn to biography, to life writing. history, he said -- and you could think that he meant to include biography and fiction -- history, he
baptist, 11,000 member congregation said christianity is right and a lot of other religions long. he called mormonism a cult. he said unkind things about islam. he's come under a lot of fire about how he talked about gays and lesbians. this is part of the reason why this controversy erupted by tim tebow accepting to speak at the church saying he was there to endorse the pastor. how they express those beliefs are much different and obviously tebow is a much softer in how he talks about his faith. pastor jeffers has been more critical about other faiths when he talks about his own. pastor jeffers has been kind enough to join us on the telephone from dallas. good afternoon. thank you for being with us. >> appreciate you having me. let me just say one thing about your report. you know, when it comes to catholicism i've said publicly there will be millions of catholics who will be in heaven because they trusted in christ the savior. i was talking about theological differences. we're outspoken in our beliefs. it's funny to me that a church like ours that simply says christ is the only way
and spreading the religion and stuff, but primarily he was about spices. why spices? why were spices so valuable back then? it wasn't just that food was finish in europe at the time -- food was terrible in europe at the time before all these things in the new world, and it was, but all these spices, each new, exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. they might make you feel a bit more randy, how should i put this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day, right? so that's one of the reasons why this trade became so valuable, and people risked their lives to explore these things. so after the conquest and kohl in iization, the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs back to europe and consuming them within this hemisphere as well. and by drugs i mean sugar -- which many people consider a drug -- where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, tea, and, of course, these afrotease yak spices, right? and so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. right? vast fortunes were created. think about, you know, where we are today, wa
study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. -- flora, fauna, philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among t
. >> we also had sister philip michael. she taught religion. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: okay. twenty-nine minutes after the hour. right back on the "stephanie miller show." ♪ alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ male announcer ] start with a groundbreaking car. good. then invent an entirely new way to buy one. no. no. no. yes! a website that works like a wedding registry. but for a car. first, you customize it. then let people sponsor the car's parts as gifts. dad sponsors the engine for your birthday. grandma sponsors the rims for graduation. the car gets funded. then you pick up your new dodge
could basically only study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among the few
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)